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Blinken cites critical minerals in China speech

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken has stressed the need for the US to reduce its reliance on imports of critical minerals in a key speech outlining the Biden administration’s policy approach to China.
Blinken cites critical minerals in China speech Blinken cites critical minerals in China speech Blinken cites critical minerals in China speech Blinken cites critical minerals in China speech Blinken cites critical minerals in China speech

Blinken cites critical minerals

Blinken's speech at the George Washington University on May 26 set out US policy principles towards its main political, economic and military rival. 

Part of this included reducing economic reliance on China. 

"We'll boost supply chain security and resilience by reshoring production or sourcing materials from other countries in sensitive sectors like pharmaceuticals and critical minerals," Blinken said. 

The US is heavily dependent on Chinese miners and refineries for a series of critical minerals, including lithium, cobalt and nickel. 

The US Geological Survey has previously noted growing Chinese production of luminum, bismuth, refined cobalt, gallium, lead, magnesite, magnesium metal, mercury, the rare earth elements, silicon, steel, titanium, vanadium, and zinc. 

President Joe Biden in March this year invoked the Defense Production Act for critical minerals to allow federal financial and policy support for the development of critical minerals in the US and to reduce the country's dependency on imports.

The Defense Department this month requested Congress to broaden the terms of the Act to allow the US to collaborate on critical minerals supply and development with allies UK and Australia

Blinken said the US will not block China from growing its economy but wanted Beijing to adhere to international rules which had allowed the country's economy to be transformed.